BIOGRAPHY

I have always been “odd”, “different”, and a little bit of a tomboy.

I used to hate playing with Barbies, but I deeply loved playing Rummy-Q. I loved imagining my universe and creating it with paper in the form of origami figures.

I guess it was in me some sort of fascination with creating “potions” and “spells” as a kid because it enabled me to become whatever I wanted.

My “weirdness” led people to think that they could bully me in high school, but it was the opposite.

It motivated me to found my first Non- Governmental Organization (NGO), “Ya Tengo Donde Escribir,” at the age of 17. I took the colorful cereal boxes and turned them into notebooks for the most vulnerable people in my home country.

BIOGRAPHY

I have always been “odd”, “different”, and a little bit of a tomboy.

I used to hate playing with Barbies, but I deeply loved playing Rummy-Q. I loved imagining my universe and creating it with paper in the form of origami figures.

I guess it was in me some sort of fascination with creating “potions” and “spells” as a kid because it enabled me to become whatever I wanted.

My “weirdness” led people to think that they could bully me in high school, but it was the opposite.

It motivated me to found my first Non- Governmental Organization (NGO), “Ya Tengo Donde Escribir,” at the age of 17. I took the colorful cereal boxes and turned them into notebooks for the most vulnerable people in my home country.

While doing this, it hit me: art connected me with people.

Some years had passed, and now I was facing a big decision. I didn’t know what to study, so I took my father’s steps in civil engineering. I didn’t hate or love it, but I got my degree. But there wasn’t any spark in me.

I went back in time and remembered my solo trips since I was 15, in which I would take photos of random things that I liked. In Paris, some locals told me I had a “good eye” and that I should keep cultivating it. Getting back into this hobby, my passion for art began to re-appear.

I used to go to museums and paint the stuff I saw, finding my style and connecting with one trace, thinking that “life is ephemeral and we have to say what we feel at the moment.” When you paint with a

While doing this, it hit me: art connected me with people.

Some years had passed, and now I was facing a big decision. I didn’t know what to study, so I took my father’s steps in civil engineering. I didn’t hate or love it, but I got my degree. But there wasn’t any spark in me.

I went back in time and remembered my solo trips since I was 15, in which I would take photos of random things that I liked. In Paris, some locals told me I had a “good eye” and that I should keep cultivating it. Getting back into this hobby, my passion for art began to re-appear.

I used to go to museums and paint the stuff I saw, finding my style and connecting with one trace, thinking that “life is ephemeral, and we have to say what we feel at the moment.” When you paint with a single trace, you don’t think, you just let it flow.”

I enjoy art and its multiple forms of expression; therefore, I dabbled as a fashion designer with Fira Pieces, handmade outwear with my one-trace drawings. However, within COVID-19 and locked down, I was feeling depressed and oppressed. I couldn’t continue with my fashion collection. The only option for me at that moment was to work with my dad, which lasted a week.

I returned to my drawings as a self-scape from reality and an expression of my true being. People liked them, and my drawings started selling for $15. My art began to grow unexpectedly and quickly, with former Colombian President Alvaro Uribe Velez (2002–2010) being one of the most well- known Fira holders at the time.

My drawings began to travel around 30 countries. Nonetheless, when people asked me for an authentication certificate, there was none. I used to scan the portrait made by hand, convert it into a JPEG, edit the background in Pic Collage, and then send it as a PDF. Sometimes I’d ship the original handmade drawing, but it was way more expensive than the actual piece.

 

My drawings began to travel around 30 countries. Nonetheless, when people asked me for an authentication certificate, there was none. I used to scan the portrait made by hand, convert it into a JPEG, edit the background in Pic Collage, and then send it as a PDF. Sometimes I’d ship the original handmade drawing, but it was way more expensive than the actual piece.

 

And just like that, I became aware that “art is a reflection of what’s happening in society” and while being in a global pandemic, my art had to evolve. That’s when NFTs came around, with their certificates and the value that they represent, transforming “Soy Fira” as the first NFT artist in Colombia, featured in Forbes, Vogue, and Bloomberg magazines; member of Global Shaper, an initiative by the World Economic Forum; an ambassador for One Young World, the world’s largest conference of young leaders, where I have a collection to support girls in STEM; EXMA speaker and representative of my generation at EXPO 2020 Dubai; co-founder of the biggest NFT telegram group in LATAM, where we are more than 2000 people, from artists to collectors and

And just like that, I became aware that “art is a reflection of what’s happening in society” and while being in a global pandemic, my art had to evolve. That’s when NFTs came around, with their certificates and the value that they represent, transforming “Soy Fira” as the first NFT artist in Colombia, featured in Forbes, Vogue, and Bloomberg magazines; member of Global Shaper, an initiative by the World Economic Forum; an ambassador for One Young World, the world’s largest conference of young leaders, where I have a collection to support girls in STEM; EXMA speaker and representative of my generation at EXPO 2020 Dubai; co-founder of the biggest NFT telegram group in LATAM, where we are more than 2000 people, from artists to collectors and

I studied civil engineering, but within art, I realized that the bridges I want to build are within people, and
crypto art is my tool.